Question: What Is The Meaning Of Synecdoche?

What does Metonymic mean?

: a figure of speech consisting of the use of the name of one thing for that of another of which it is an attribute or with which it is associated (such as “crown” in “lands belonging to the crown”).

How can I remember metonymy?

An easy way to remember metonymy is that the prefix ‘meto-‘ means change, and the suffix ‘-onymy’ means a name/word or set of names/words. In simpler words, you could say that Metonymy is ‘using a single feature to represent the whole’.

What is an example of a synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which, most often, a part of something is used to refer to its whole. For example, “The captain commands one hundred sails” is a synecdoche that uses “sails” to refer to ships—ships being the thing of which a sail is a part.

What does synecdoche mean in English?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech referring to when a part of something is used to refer to the whole, such as in the phrase “all hands on deck,” where “hands” are people. … ‘Synecdoche’ is when a part of something is used to refer to the whole. ‘Metonymy’ is when something is used to represent something related to it.

How do you identify a synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase that refers to a part of something is substituted to stand in for the whole, or vice versa. For example, the phrase “all hands on deck” is a demand for all of the crew to help, yet the word “hands”—just a part of the crew—stands in for the whole crew.

How do you prevent synecdoche?

The best way to avoid this effect is to run your writing past alpha or beta readers and to be willing to kill your darlings. When synecdoche outgrows its proper place, it tends to do so because a writer enjoyed writing a diversion a little too much, treating it as an opportunity to indulge in some purple prose.

What is the most common form of metonymy?

A common form of metonymy uses a place to stand in for an institution, industry, or person. “Wall Street” is an example of this, as is “the White House” to mean the President or Presidential administration of the United States, or “Hollywood” to mean the American film industry.

What are examples of oxymorons?

Common OxymoronsAct naturally.Alone together.Amazingly awful.Bittersweet.Clearly confused.Dark light.Deafening silence.Definitely maybe.More items…

Which is the best example of synecdoche?

Forms of SynecdocheThe word “sails” is often used to refer to a whole ship.The phrase “hired hands” can be used to refer to workers.The word “head” can refer to counting cattle or people.The word “bread” can be used to represent food in general or money (e.g. he is the breadwinner; music is my bread and butter).More items…

What figure of speech is synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a rhetorical trope and a type of figurative speech similar to metonymy—a figure of speech that uses a term that denotes one thing to refer to a related thing. Indeed, synecdoche is considered by some a type of metonymy.

What is an example of metonymy?

Metonymy is the use of a linked term to stand in for an object or concept. … Sometimes metonymy is chosen because it’s a well-known characteristic of the concept. A famous example is, “The pen is mightier than the sword,” from Edward Bulwer Lytton’s play Richelieu.

Is lend me your ears synecdoche or metonymy?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech where a part of something is used for the whole or vice versa. Therefore lend me your ears is a synecdoche because in lending the ears the person is using part of the body to give the person making the statement his/her full attention.

What is oxymoron in figure of speech?

An “oxymoron” is a figure of speech that has two contradictory or opposite words appearing side by side. So, basically, it’s a combination of two words that really have opposite meanings, but we use them, you know, regularly in sentences and phrases.